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1705 Amherst St #102
Winchester, VA

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Reading a dental blog from Shenandoah Family Dentistry Dr. Jared Pell has created this informative blog to help educate the community.

Latest Posts:
Why Might Your Teeth Ache When You Get Up in the Morning?
Posted on 11/25/2019 by Jared Pell, DDS
Do you go to sleep with no discomfort in your teeth, but wake up with a toothache? Is the ache in your tooth or teeth accompanied by a headache or a sore jaw? Does this leave you unable from enjoying your breakfast? Let's take a look at the reasons for why this happens. Common Reasons Why People Wake Up with a Toothache? Tooth clenching and grinding are among the most common reasons why people wake up with sore teeth. Stress and temperature fluctuations are common reasons for this. If the condition is not treated, the person may end up with progressively weaker and finally cracked teeth. Ten percent of the American population experiences bruxism to varying degrees. We can provide you with a solution, possibly a mouth guard to be worn at night. Food particles stuck in the teeth, for example pieces of hard candy or meat, can irritate teeth and gums, and also contribute to dental cavities. The remedy for this is simple. Brush and floss your teeth. People who tend to sleep with their mouths open may wake up with a dry mouth because the saliva dries out, resulting in discomfort in the throat. Teeth exposed to the night air may ache as well. Could the position in which you sleep be a possible reason? Placing your hand under the cheek when you sleep or resting the face close to the headboard or the railing on the edge of the bed for too long may leave you with a sore jaw. These are some possible reasons for a sore jaw in the morning. It could be something else, like maybe a sinus issue. If you're faced with this situation, then we can help with the treatment. We are dental care experts and we love it when people ask us questions. Talk to us and help yourself. Get in touch with us today....
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What Type of Pain Should You Expect if You Are Developing a Cavity?
Posted on 11/15/2019 by Jared Pell, DDS
Tooth filling occurs when there is a need to correct common tooth decay issues or cavities. The filling is meant to ease any discomfort these issues may cause. Not everyone experiences pain after a filling, and there are a variety of causes and reasons why some do and not others. Most of the time, pain is a result of simply repairing the damage. In other cases, it may be that the filling needs to be adjusted to fit properly, or there is another instance of decay or cavity in the tooth that was not addressed, and needs to be repaired. There are tons of options our dental professionals can provide for relieving the pain after you come in for a filling. Read on to find out why there is pain after a filling, and how you can manage it before you can get in for an appointment. Why You Experience Pain after a Filling Slight pain and discomfort after a tooth filling is pretty common. Sometimes, patients may even experience a bit of sensitivity to hot and cold foods and beverages. This is because during a filling, our dentists will need to do a lot of prodding, poking and drilling in your mouth. Slight discomfort usually dissipates after 48-72 hours at most. When you come in for your initial exam, you can discuss the different types of filling options available and what type of side effects come with each. How to Manage Pain after a Filling To avoid decay and cavities to begin with, develop a rigorous and consistent daily oral hygiene routine. Brush your teeth at least twice a day, especially after meals, and floss at least one time a day. This helps to keep your tooth enamel protected from damage. Regular visits to our office can help identify problems before they even start, so they don't turn out to be major issues later on down the line. Schedule your consultation in our office and speak to one of our highly trained dental professionals....
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Signs You May Have Gum Disease Besides Bleeding Gums
Posted on 10/30/2019 by Jared Pell, DDS
Gum disease often catches our clients by surprise. You may not see severe symptoms until you are already in advanced stages of the disease, since the earliest signs and symptoms typically do not include pain. In addition to bleeding gums, there are many other signs to look for. Here are some of the most common signs that we ask our patients to be on the lookout for. Swollen or Tender Gums Inflammation is usually caused by bacteria on your teeth. When your gums swell up, even a little, take notice. If the inflammation does not go down, give our office a call. Gums Pulling Away From Your Teeth Gum disease can lead to bone loss, which can accompany your gums receding. If your gums start to push back, then you need to come in and get checked out. Loose Teeth Loose teeth can be caused by infection around the gums. If the infection is not treated, it can lead to complete tooth loss. By treating gum disease, especially in its earliest stages, we can then avoid teeth getting loose or falling out. Sensitivity Gum disease can make your teeth more prone to sensitivity. This can include being sensitive to heat and cold, as well as being sensitive to different tastes, like bitter and sweet. Bad Breath That Will Not Go Away Chronic bad breath can be a sign of gum disease. Bad breath is typically caused by trapped bacteria below the gum tissue. This is one of the easiest ways to figure out that your gums need a bit of help. Keep a look out for these warning signs. Contact us with any questions or to schedule an appointment. The sooner we can begin treating gum disease, the easier it is to treat, and the higher your chances become of being able to totally spare your mouth these side effects....
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All Posts:
Why Might Your Teeth Ache When You Get Up in the Morning?
11/25/2019
What Type of Pain Should You Expect if You Are Developing a Cavity?
11/15/2019
Signs You May Have Gum Disease Besides Bleeding Gums
10/30/2019
How to Pick the Right Toothpaste for Your Needs
10/15/2019
Can You Spot Oral Cancers at Home
9/25/2019
How Does Tea Stain Your Teeth
9/15/2019
Is a Filling That Sits Too High a Problem?
8/20/2019
How to Manage Bruxism When You Sleep Through Doing It
8/10/2019
Could Your Oral Health Improve from Including Pumpkin in Your Diet?
7/20/2019
Dangers of Chewing on Ice When it Gets Warm Outside
7/10/2019
Reasons to Not Use Electric Toothbrushes
6/20/2019
How to Tell if You Are Getting a Dental Abscess
6/10/2019
Ideal Foods for Stress Reduction So You Can Stop Grinding Your Teeth
5/25/2019
Ideal Foods for Stress Reduction So You Can Stop Grinding Your Teeth
5/25/2019
Your Teeth Love It When You Snack on Vegetables
5/15/2019
Your Teeth Love It When You Snack on Vegetables
5/15/2019
Is 30 Minutes the Right Amount of Time to Wait to Brush?
4/25/2019
Is 30 Minutes the Right Amount of Time to Wait to Brush?
4/20/2019
Invisalign Questions You May Want to Ask Us
4/15/2019
Invisalign Questions You May Want to Ask Us
4/10/2019
Teeth That Shift During the Night Often Have a Reason
3/30/2019
Teeth That Shift During the Night Often Have a Reason
3/25/2019
How Can You Tell If You Are Starting to Develop a Cavity?
3/20/2019
How Can You Tell If You Are Starting to Develop a Cavity?
3/15/2019
Benefits of Using Waxed Floss
2/25/2019
About to Be in Pictures? Here Are Some Quick Tips to Brighten Your Smile!
2/15/2019
Times When You Should Avoid a Fluoride Treatment
1/30/2019
Things You May Not Even Realize Your Teeth Are Trying to Tell You
1/15/2019
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New Blog
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Shenandoah Family Dentistry | www.winchestersmiles.com | (540) 773-0011
1705 Amherst St #102, Winchester, VA 22601
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